Greece’s debt crisis explained in charts and maps

Greece’s debt crisis explained in charts and maps

The roots of Greece’s crisis are simple. Before Greece joined the Eurozone, investors treated it as a middle-income country with poor governance — which is to say, a credit risk. After Greece joined the Eurozone, investors thought that Greece was no longer a credit risk — they figured, if push came to shove, other Eurozone members like Germany would bail Greece out. They were wrong.

If you had to pick one chart that encapsulates Greece’s crisis, it would be this one:

Chart - Eurozone bond yields

As this chart, via the American Enterprise Institute’s Desmond Lachman, shows, after Greece joined the Eurozone, investors began lending to Greece at about the same rates as they lend to Germany. Faced with this sudden availability of cheap money, Greece began borrowing like crazy. And then, when it couldn’t pay back its debts, it turned out financial markers were wrong: Germany and other Eurozone nations weren’t willing to simply bail Greece out.

That led the market to panic around 2010, and you can see interest rates on Greek debt spike once again. Those high interest rates make it basically impossible for Greece to borrow, and that makes it impossible for Greece to pay its debts.

The result: Greece is insolvent and the Eurozone isn’t as tight a union as the financial markets — and maybe the Eurozone’s member states — believed. That’s the crisis.

– – – > Complete article and charts at http://www.vox.com/2015/7/1/8871509/greece-charts

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In addition you can find more results from our efforts at finding the missing pieces at :

 Thinking about Economy and Democracy – here.

*   World Streets on the Greek Crisis – here.

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About the author:

Eric Britton
13, rue Pasteur. Courbevoie 92400 France

Bio: Founding editor of World Streets (1988), Eric Britton is an American political scientist, teacher, occasional consultant, mediator and sustainability activist who has observed, learned, taught and worked on missions and advisory assignments on all continents. In the autumn of 2019, he committed his remaining life work to the challenges of aggressively countering climate change and specifically greenhouse gas emissions emanating from the mobility sector. He is not worried about running out of work. Further background and updates: @ericbritton | http://bit.ly/2Ti8LsX | #fekbritton | https://twitter.com/ericbritton | and | https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericbritton/ Contact: climate@newmobility.org) | +336 508 80787 (Also WhatApp) | Skype: newmobility.)

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