Greece’s debt crisis explained in charts and maps

Greece’s debt crisis explained in charts and maps

The roots of Greece’s crisis are simple. Before Greece joined the Eurozone, investors treated it as a middle-income country with poor governance — which is to say, a credit risk. After Greece joined the Eurozone, investors thought that Greece was no longer a credit risk — they figured, if push came to shove, other Eurozone members like Germany would bail Greece out. They were wrong.

If you had to pick one chart that encapsulates Greece’s crisis, it would be this one:

Chart - Eurozone bond yields

As this chart, via the American Enterprise Institute’s Desmond Lachman, shows, after Greece joined the Eurozone, investors began lending to Greece at about the same rates as they lend to Germany. Faced with this sudden availability of cheap money, Greece began borrowing like crazy. And then, when it couldn’t pay back its debts, it turned out financial markers were wrong: Germany and other Eurozone nations weren’t willing to simply bail Greece out.

That led the market to panic around 2010, and you can see interest rates on Greek debt spike once again. Those high interest rates make it basically impossible for Greece to borrow, and that makes it impossible for Greece to pay its debts.

The result: Greece is insolvent and the Eurozone isn’t as tight a union as the financial markets — and maybe the Eurozone’s member states — believed. That’s the crisis.

– – – > Complete article and charts at http://www.vox.com/2015/7/1/8871509/greece-charts

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In addition you can find more results from our efforts at finding the missing pieces at :

 Thinking about Economy and Democracy – here.

*   World Streets on the Greek Crisis – here.

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About the author:

Eric Britton
9, rue Gabillot, 69003 Lyon France

Bio: Trained as a development economist, Eric Britton is a public entrepreneur specializing in the field of sustainability and social justice. Professor of Sustainable Development, Economy and Democracy at the Institut Supérieur de Gestion (Paris), he is also MD of EcoPlan Association, an independent advisory network providing strategic counsel for government and business on policy and decision issues involving complex systems, social-technical change and sustainable development. Founding editor of World Streets, his latest work focuses on the subject of equity, economy and efficiency in city transport and public space, and helping governments to ask the right questions -- and in the process, find practical solutions to urgent climate, mobility, life quality and job creation issues. More at: http://wp.me/PsKUY-2p7

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